SilverRail Employee Profile Series volume 3: Paul Barrow

Paul Barrow has just had his first SilverRail anniversary, and is responsible for the producing all of our documentation in SilverCentral, our online developer resources, as well as managing our internal wiki.  Basically, if we didn't have Paul, our customers would be feeling around in the dark trying to implement to our API.  But thanks to Paul, we have an excellent and comprehensive documentation suite that has been extremely helpful for our new partners.  

And like me, Paul is a fellow Brit in the Boston office, so a good partner for rants about the lack of decent tea and Marmite in the US.  Thanks for overcoming your "British reluctance to talk about yourself" Paul, and keep up the great work.

Name

Paul Barrow

Title at SRT

Customer Documentation Manager

Describe what you do for SilverRail

I write the technical documentation for SilverRail's product line, specifically the developer guides and reference manuals for the SilverCore API. To give the technical docs somewhere to live, I designed and built the SilverCentral customer portal. I'm also unofficial toolsmith for the company's internal wiki.

How long have you been with SilverRail

I joined at the end of September 2010.

Favorite thing about working at SilverRail

We're a small startup. That means no egos, no empires, and everyone counts.

An interesting fact about you

According to family records, my great-grandfather helped build the rail network in Britain. From 1899 to 1903 he ran a construction crew working on the South Wales and Bristol Direct Railway, an extension of the Great Western Railway connecting London to Wales via the Severn Tunnel. There's a high-speed service on that line today so I guess he did a good job.

What do you do outside of SilverRail

I'm the webmaster for several sites connected to amateur soccer in Massachusetts. Then when I realize I'm doing the same thing outside of SilverRail as I do inside SilverRail, I go ride my motorcycle.

Any good stories you have relating to trains

Growing up in the UK, I remember taking school trips on the InterCity 125 trains shortly after they came into service. When another 125 passed in the opposite direction, with a combined closing speed over 200mph, some optimistic train spotter in the carriage would invariably ask, "Did anyone get the engine number?..."